Bieler's Broth: Liver Cleansing soup in a white mug

Bieler’s Broth: Liver Cleansing & Kidney Calming

What is Bieler’s Broth?

Today I like to share an incredibly healing and very easily digestable soup recipe with you called ‘Bieler’s Broth’. This very nourishing and healing ‘Bieler’s broth’ is superb for cleansing the liver whilst also being very soothing for the kidneys.

First of all it’s name comes from a doctor named Bieler who inveted the soup in order to restore an acid-alkaline and sodium-potassium balance to organs and glands. Especially the sodium-loving adrenal glands which often suffer severly under stress.

The soup is vegan and all vegetable-based. It is not a culinary soup, so it can be a little bland for people who are used to flavourful spicings of their soups. However, it’s tasty enough that you can eat it a few days in a row and thus is super suitable for cleanses and detox diets.

The broth is also very supportive for liver function — remember that the liver is our detoxifying organ.

Bieler’s broth contains zucchini and string beans, which are rich sources of organic potassium and sodium. The liver uses those elements to clean and revitalize the body. Occasionally, when you’re sick, the best thing to do is not eat and let the body heal. Digestion takes a lot of energy.  Instead, drink Dr. Bieler’s healing broth recipe for energy, weight loss, and cleansing.

Background: Dr. Bieler would take a detailed study of his patients’ endocrine glands. This includes the adrenal glands, pituitary gland and the thyroid gland. Dr. Bieler would then prescribe a limited diet, or even a fast on Bieler’s broth. The vegetables were cooked and easy to digest, full of vitamins and restore such elements as potassium and sodium to our glands. Dr. Bieler was particularly interested in restoring the liver.

What else ?

Dr. Bieler believed that most folks eat excessive amounts of proteins. He said that milk and eggs lose their nutritional value after being pasteurized/cooked, and that meat cooked to temperature above rare becomes hard to digest. According to him, salt is a stimulant providing only a temporary sensation of well-being, and over consumption is detrimental to health. The best way to obtain necessary sodium is from plants (vegetables), not addition of salt. He gave a number of examples of disease-free cultures that do not have access to salt.

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Feeling Vata: This soup might be a little light for you, sensitive Vata, as there’s no oils or added fats in this detox recipe. However if you’re on a cleanse and if not eaten for longer periods than 3 days, this soup can work well for you on a detox or cleanse if the overall detox programm is well thought out and stabilising to your system.

Feeling Pitta:  This soup works really well for you, go for it!

Feeling Kapha:  Perfect soup for a kapha cleanse, go for it!

Healing Recipe

Bieler’s Broth: Liver Cleansing & Kidney Calming Soup

Bieler's Broth: Liver Cleansing green soup in a glass jar

Bieler’s Broth: Liver Cleansing & Kidney Calming Soup

The soup is vegan and all vegetable-based. It is not a culinary soup, so it can be a little bland for people who are used to flavourful spicing of their soups. However, it’s tasty enough that you can eat it a few days in a row and thus super suitable for cleanses and detox diets.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 35 mins
Course Soup
Cuisine Cleansing
Servings 4 person

Ingredients
  

  • 4 medium zuchinis
  • 450 g string beans
  • 2 stalks cellery chopped
  • 1 bunch parsley chopped
  • 4 cups water

Instructions
 

  • Place all ingredients in a large pot and bring to the boil. Skim any foam off the surface.
  • Lower the heat and simmer, covered.
  • Cook the vegetables until the are tender, about 15 minutes.
  • Take off the heat and then puree the soup in the pot with a hand-held blender.
  • Serve warm, sprinkled with a little bit of fresh parsley on top if you like.
  • Enjoy!

Notes

You can experiment by adding fresh kale(or other fresh, leafy greens of your choice) to your soup. For this, chop some kale and add it into the soup towards the end of your cooking time.
Keyword adrenal healing, adrenals, ayurveda, bielers, broth, detox, dosha, Liver healing, Liver-Cleansing, simple, Soup, Vegan


fresh vegetable lentil soup with plenty of lentils and greens in a white ceramic bowl

Granny’s Hearty Lentil Soup (Vegan Style)

Why Lentil Soup?

This very hearty lentil soup is straight out of my granny’s recipe book. It’s vegan, it’s tasty, it’s healthy!

From an ayurvedic perspective, legumes are essential for a healthy lifestyle and diet. Rich in protein, complex carbs and nutrients, they are a staple in any ayurvedic diet. Lentils can be included in many different recipes such as soups, salads, and even home-made veggie burgers. They also provide you with healthy energy, fiber and can reduce cholesterol. This very hearty and warming lentil soup is straight out of my grandma’s recipe book. Yes, back in the day my granny would be adding meat and butter to this recipe. So I’ve amended it to give you the updated, modern day vegan version. There’s dosha tipps & amendments suitable for your body type as always included in the sections below. Amend this dish suiting your type and I am certain it’ll soon become one of your favourite kitchen staples! Enjoy!

What about digestion ?

You have probably experienced that lentils & beans can cause the odd bout of gas (or bloating). This is why lentils (or beans) are also called the ‘musical fruit’. This is due to the naturally occuring saponins which lentils have to protect themselves against insects. Saponins form the sudsy foam on the surface of a cooking pot of beans. They prevent protein digestion resulting in stagnation and gas of the bowels. Brown lentils are slightly more difficult to digest for some (rather than red lentils or yellow lentils which are slightly easier to digest). Brown lentils are best for Pitta and Kapha. However, due to their drying quality, they may aggravate an already dry Vata dosha.

Cooking Tips to Improve Digestion

Cooking lentils with oil and digestive herbs will help improve their digestibility. Soak the lentils at least for 6 hours or overnight (as a rule of thumb you should do this with all types of lentils). Yellow mung dal and red lentils require the least amount of soaking (with only a minimum of 1 hour before cooking). Don’t add salt until after lentils are completely cooked. By adding salt at the beginning of the cooking process it will make the outside hard, increasing the cooking time. Also ensure that the lentils are completely cooked. If they are not cooked fully they may stress the digestive system. Always eat pulses with plenty of culinary herbs and spices to help digest them, for example asafoetida, ajwain and fennel. Others such as cumin, coriander and fresh ginger can also also help.

ayurveda

Feeling Vata: Brown lentils can be a little tricky for you to digest, cause bloating and gas and canmake a very dry Vata even drier. If you know that this is you, then you can replace the brown lentils in this recipe with red lentils. I, for example, am a Vata/Pitta type and and can tolerate brown lentils in moderation. Always ensure you soak your lentils at least for 6 hours.

Feeling Pitta:  This soup works really well for you, go for it!

Feeling Kapha:  This is a good meail for you. You can try adding more black pepper, some caynenne, or other warming spice such cumin, ginger, and turmeric. Adding these spices to your cooking can invigorate a sluggish kapha digestion.

Healing Recipe

Granny’s Hearty Lentil Soup

fresh vegetable lentil soup with plenty of lentils and greens in a white ceramic bowl

Granny’s Hearty Lentil Soup (Vegan Style)

This very hearty lentil soup is straight out of my granny's recipe book. It's vegan, it's tasty, it's healthy! Yes, back in the day my granny would be adding meat and butter to this recipe. So I've amended it to give you the updated, modern day vegan version. There's dosha tipps & amendments suitable for your body type as always included in the sections below. Amend this dish suiting your type and I am certain it'll soon become one of your favourite kitchen staples! Enjoy!
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 35 mins
Course Main Course, Soup
Servings 4

Ingredients
  

  • 8 medium potatoes diced
  • 1.5 Litres stock ensure you use stock or stock cubes that are pure and with good quality organic herbs only. Avoid stock that has maltodextrin, sugars or extra fats added (no fats needed in a good stock powder). Also avoid all types of flavourings (natural and un-natural) as these are usually just cover-ups for different types of MSG.
  • 250 gramm brown lentils
  • 1 leek chopped
  • 1 bunch parsley chopped
  • 8 medium carrots chopped

Instructions
 

  • Add the potatoes and the chopped carrots to large cooking pot and cover in the stock and start cooking on medium heat.
  • Put the lentils in a seperate pot, cover with water (rule: 3 cups of water to 1 cup of lentils), and bring to the boil.
  • Once the lentils have boiled, reduce to medium heat and simmer for around 30 minutes until the lentils are cooked.
  • Once the carrots and potatoes are cooked, add the leeks and keep simmering on low to medium heat.
  • Once lentils are cooked, drain them off the cooking water and add them to the potato, leek and carrots mix.
  • Add the chopped parsley to the pot and simmer everything for another 5 minutes.
  • Season with salt & pepper and serve in warm bowls.
  • Enjoy!
Keyword ayurveda, dosha, grannys, healthy, hearty, lentils, Soup, stew, winterwarmer


Beetroot Borscht

Vegan Borscht: Anti-Inflammatory & Liver Protecting

Vegan Borscht

This modern, vegan version of a traditional classic borscht is super flavourful, warming and brimming with anti-inflammatory properties.

What is Borscht?

Borscht! Borscht! Borscht! What’s not to like about this so very flavourful, earthy and deeply fullfilling spectactle of a soup? Traditionally made with beetroot, potatoes and some form of beef stock, borscht is a classic kitchen recipe associated with the cuisine of eastern and central Europe (especially Russia, Poland, and the Ukraine). Here we will cook a delicious vegan version of this all-time hearty favourite.

What is beetroot food for?

Beetroot is good for the liver:

They contain antioxidants, vitamin A, vitamin B-6, and iron. These compounds help protect the liver from inflammation and oxidative stress while enhancing its ability to remove toxins from the body. Beets’ juice has traditionally been used as a remedy to activate liver enzymes and to increase bile, which helps the liver’s detox function. They are also high in compounds that have been shown to reduce inflammation, protect against oxidative stress and reduce the risk of liver damage.

Beets can reduce inflammation:

Their juice contains anti-inflammatory compounds called betalains. Many studies have shown that betalains help modulate inflammatory reactions, especially in inflammatory diseases. Beetroots therefor make a great choice for people with inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia.

Beetroots can help reduce blood pressure:

Beets naturally contain large quantities of nitrates, which the body converts into nitric oxide. This compound dilates the blood vessels, which improves blood flow and lowers overall blood pressure.

Beets can help prevent anemia:

Beetroots are also rich in iron, an essential component of red blood cells. Without iron, red blood cells cannot transport oxygen around the body. People who have low iron levels can sometimes develop a condition called iron deficiency anemia. Adding sources of iron to the diet can reduce the risk of this condition.

ayurveda

Feeling Vata: This soup is great for you. Packed full of root vegetables to ground lofty Vata especially during winter times or whenever you feel a little out of sorts. Cabbage can be ok for Vata if cooked and not eaten too often, however if you know that cabbage gets you really gassy, then you can leave out the cabbage and cook the soup without it.

Feeling Pitta: Beetroots pacify pitta so this is a very good soup for you. If you’re feeling very Pitta leave out the garlic. Ensure you use the white and not the red onion as red onions can aggravate pitta.

Feeling Kapha: As this soup is full of root vegetables which can aggravate an already heavy Kapha, this is not the best soup for you to enjoy when your Kapha is high. A healing mung bean soup is much more pacifying for your dosha and easier for you to digest, leaving you feeling less heavy. However if you do want to enjoy a bit of beetroot goodness, than use much less of the beetroots and carrots and use more of the cabbage (can also be substituted with white cabbage). Use very little or no salt but you can add more black pepper and more of the lemon juice.

Healing Recipe

Liver Protecting & Anti-Inflammatory Beetroot Borscht

Liver Protecting & Anti-Inflammatory Beetroot Borscht

Beetroot Borscht

Borscht! Borscht! Borscht! What’s not to like about this so very flavourful, earthy and deeply fullfilling spectactle of a soup? Traditionally made with beetroot, potatoes and some form of beef stock, borscht is a classic kitchen recipe associated with the cuisine of eastern and central Europe, especially Russia, Poland, and the Ukraine. Here we will cook a delicious vegan version of this all-time hearty favourite, that’s also very good for your health!

Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves chopped finely
  • 1 medium white or red onion
  • 6 beetroots, diced cooked (I use the pre-cooked ones from the supermarket)
  • 1 small piece of celeriac diced
  • 2 celery stalks chopped
  • 4 large potatoes diced
  • 700 gr red cabbage sliced into fine strips
  • 1 tsp black caraway ground in pestle and mortar
  • 4 carrots sliced
  • 2 bayleaves
  • 2 tbsp parsley chopped
  • 4 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1,25 liter vegetable broth without added fats or additives, and no added yeast or MSG or natural flavourings
  • salt to taste
  • pepper to taste
  • juice of ½ a lemon

Instructions

    1. Fry the onion and the garlic in the oil on low to medium heat for a few minutes until softened.
    2. Add the diced potatoes and fry lightly along with the onion and garlic mix for a few minutes. Stir frequently.
    3. Add the celery stalks, the beetroot and the celeriac. I always add the juice from the pack of the cooked beetroot (if using raw beetroot cook these first for 30 – 40 min and then add to this mix). Keep cooking on medium heat and stir frequently for around five minutes.
    4. Add the vegetable stock and bring to the boil.
    5. Add the cabbage and the black caraway.
    6. Add the remaining vegetables, bay leaves, the tomato paste and salt and pepper.
    7. Simmer for about 20 minutes, until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir several times. Season to taste with salt (but try and go easy with it as this is a healing soup. Try and avoid the salt altogether if you can).
    8. After 20 mins have passed, try the soup to see if all the vegetables are cooked through and tender. If so, take the soup off the heat and stir in the lemon juice.
    9. Now you are ready to serve and eat your soup! Voila!


Nourishing Vegetable and Lentil Soup

Nourishing Vegetable & Lentil Soup

This nourishing vegetable and lentil soup is the perfect winter-warmer: I usually make it at least once a week and it eat it for days (reheated tastes even better).

This perfect winter-warmer is a winner for every dosha, simply follow the dosha adjustments below. This soup is fully packed with proteins. It’s giving you an amino-acid boost that bolsters your tissues and strengthens your immune system. Plus, a powerhouse of spices deliver antioxidants and anti-inflammatarory compounds: to let you fly with ease through the cold and flu season. Additional shitake mushrooms also provide this soup with a great earthy flavour and slightly ‘meaty’ texture.

Native to Asia, shitake mushrooms have gained widespread popularity across the world. They are the third most cultivated mushroom on the planet today. This isn’t surprising as shitake mushrooms boost quite the nutritional profile. They contain Vitamin D, Copper, Selenium, Thiamin (B1), Riboflavin (B2), Niacin (B3), Folate (B9) and B12 amongst others. But that’s not all. Shitake mushrooms are also said to have antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal properties. They are also said to be potent in fighting inflammations and helping in keeping your blood sugar stable.

Shitake mushrooms also deliver immune-modulating beta-glucans. Beta-glucans activate immune cells, increase antibody production, increase viral-inhibiting proteins and in short, they are great anti-cancer preventatives.

What more can you want from your soup?!

ayurveda

Feeling Vata: This soup is great for you. Swap brown lentils for red lentils for easier digestion and less bloating or gas.

Feeling Pitta: If your pitta is high swap potatoes with sweet potatoes and leave out the hot stuff such as paprika, cayenne and use less or no garlic. Skip the tomato paste.

Feeling Kapha: This is a great dish for you if you simply use a little bit less of the lentils and instead use more of the vegetables. All spices are great for Kapha, so go ahead and season well with the spices recomended in this recipe. Especially cayenne is great to boost Kapha’s sluggish metabolism.
Avoid the lemon in the end and go easy on the salt! Voila!

Weekly Recipe

Nourishing Vegetable & Lentil Soup

Yield: 1 pot

Nourishing Vegetable and Lentil Soup

Nourishing Vegetable and Lentil Soup

Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes

Ingredients

  • half a red onion, chopped
  • 2 x garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 x celery stalks, chopped
  • 3 x medium sized carrots, chopped
  • 1 x and a half cougette, chopped 
  • 2 x medium sized potatoes, chopped into small cubes
  • 150g shitake mushrooms (optional)
  • 1.5 x tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 x Litre vegetable stock / bouillon (yeast free, without added fats)
  • 1.5 cups brown lentils (alternatively use red lentils)
  • 1/2 x teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 x teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 2 x teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika powder
  • 1 x teaspoon of coriander seeds, ground in pestle & mortar
  • one pinch cayenne pepper
  • 1 x bay leaf
  • 1 x tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 x handful of parsley, chopped
  • 2 x handfuls of spinach, washed and trimmed
  • black pepper and salt for seasoning
  • juice from half a lemon

Instructions

  1. If you are using dry shitake mushrooms, ensure that you soak them in water before cooking for usually 5-8 hours (according to pack).
  2. Add the olive oil to a large stock pot. Heat slowly on a very low heat setting, then add the onions and the garlic. Stir with a wooden spoon for a while. Add the cinnamon, cumin, turmeric and add a little salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Grind the coriander seeds in a pestle & mortar and add as well.
  3. Stir the spices well into the oil and onion mix, until you you have a nice oily mix. Keep heating on low until the onions and garlic become fragrant and slightly translucent.
  4. Add the potatoe cubes and carrots, and stir into the onion spice mix. Heat up to a medium heat and keep stirring for about 3 to 5 minutes until the vegetables are nicely coated in spices and oil.
  5. Add the courgette and celery pieces and stir in to the mix for 1 minute. If the mix is to dry add a little water if need be.
  6. Now add the lentils. Stir well into the vegetable and spice mix.
  7. Add the paprika and tomato paste. Cook for 1 minute.
  8. Add the 1.5 Liters of vegetable stock. It should be enough stock in the pot that the vegetables and lentils are well covered (the lentils will soak up a lot of water during cooking). Add more water if not covered enough.
  9. Add the bay leaves.
  10. Bring to the boil, then reduce heat and simmer and cook for 10 minutes.
  11. Add the shitake mushrooms if using.
  12. Cook for another 20 minutes (unil the lentils are nice, soft and mushy and the vegetables are soft and tender, if not simply cook a bit longer until the soup has a nice consistency to your liking).
  13. Stir in the spinach and half of the chopped parsley, simmer for a another few minutes until the spinach is wilted and cooked to your liking.
  14. Squeeze half a lemon and stir through the soup.
  15. Take off the heat and season with salt and pepper.
  16. Serve and garnish with the left-over parsley, some vegan plant-based yoghurt,and if you're a Kapha type, some chillies and cherry tomatoes go a long way!

Notes

This soup is also delicious with some black beans or chickpeas additional or instead off the brown lentils if you're a pitta or a kapha type. Vata's better stay clear of too many legumes or beans.


Liver Cleansing Cabbage & Celery Soup

Liver cleansing, gut healing, immune boosting and anti-bacterial! What’s not to like! Get stuck into this marvellous yummy soup. Eat it anytime of the year when you feel you want to eat something nourishing that also gives your body that extra ‘oompf’ to cleanse and heal.

Weekly Recipe

Liver Cleansing Cabbage & Celery Soup

Yield: 1 Large Pot of Soup

Liver Cleansing Cabbage & Celery Soup

Liver Cleansing Cabbage & Celery Soup

Liver cleansing, gut healing, immune boosting and anti-bacterial! What's not to like! Get stuck into this marvellous yummy soup. Eat it anytime of the year when you feel you want to eat something nourishing that also gives your body that extra 'oompf' to cleanse and heal.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • half a teaspoon of turmeric
  • 1 tsp aniseeds
  • 3 tsp fennel seeds
  • 2 tsp sesame oil (leave out if doing a cleanse, or onl consumer in evening)
  • 2 stalks of celery, chopped
  • half head of one medium sized cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 1/3 of a fresh fennel bulb, chopped
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 litre of vegetable stock (ensure you're stock powder doesn't contain any extra added fats such as rapeseed, palm oil or sunflower, or flavourings or things like maltodextrin - stay away!)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 3 tbsp cocos aminos

Instructions

  1. Grind the fennel seeds and aniseeds with a pestle and mortar.
  2. Heat the sesame oil in a large stock pot (of on cleanse leave out the oil, or onl use if this is your evening meal. Simply add a bit of water to the bottom of the pan instead.)
  3. Add the fresh ginger, garlic and turmeric. Mix well with the oil (or water if on a cleanse) and heat on low for 3-4 minutes.
  4. Add the fennel and aniseeds, mix well with the ginger and garlic mix, and keep heating on low until the seeds become fragant (about 4 - 5 minutes).
  5. Add the cabbage, celery, fresh fennel and salt and mix in well with the spice and garlic mixture. Saute for 5 minutes, until veggies start to soften, stirring often.
  6. Add broth, cocos aminos and chicken to the pot and bring to a boil, then cover and simmer until veggies are cooked to your liking (I simmer usually for 20-30 min).
  7. Give it a taste and season with more salt and pepper if needed.
  8. Garnish with fresh coriander and serve! Voila!

Warming Turmeric & Cauliflower Broth

Weekly Recipe

Warming Cauliflower & Turmeric Broth

Yield: 1 Large Stock Pot

Warming Turmeric & Cauliflower Broth

Warming Turmeric & Cauliflower Broth
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 shallot, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, diced
  • 5 tsp yellow Lupin Miso (I don't use Soya products as I strongly believe these increase inflammation in the body). You can omit this ingredient and just flavour more with salt, pepper, stock, and coconut aminos or lupin sauce.
  • 1 tsp anisseeds
  • 1 fingerlong fresh root of turmeric, minced
  • 1 inch fresh ginger, minced
  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 200g brown button mushrooms, chopped
  • quarter head cauliflower, chopped into florets
  • 1 medium zuchini, chopped and diced
  • 1.5 litres vegetable stock
  • 6 tsbp cocos aminos
  • 3 tsp powdered turmeric
  • one chicoree head, sliced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • brown rice noodles (I use king soba noodles)
  • juice of 1 and 1/2 lemon

Instructions

  1. To a large stock pot, add the shallot, ginger, the fresh turmeric, garlic and aniseeds (ground in pestle and mortar). Add half a cup of water, and stirr occasionally, cooking on low heat until the shallot and garlic become fragrant and translucent for a about 5 minutes.
  2. Stirr in the lupin miso and cook for another 2 minutes.
  3. Stir in the chopped mushrooms and keep cooking on low heat for another 5 minutes, stirring occassionally.
  4. Stirr in the chopped zuchini and cauliflower and cook for another 2 minutes on low heat, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add the vegetable stock to the mushroom mix, stirring well.
  6. Add the cocos aminos and the turmeric powder.
  7. Bring to the boil, then lower heat to a simmer.
  8. Simmer for 15 minutes, lid on.
  9. Add the chicoree and simmer for another 5 minutes, plus add salt and pepper to taste.
  10. In the meantime boil the rice noodles according to instructions in a seperate pot.
  11. Stir the lemon juice into the broth and let it sit off the heat for 1 minute.
  12. Ladle the broth into bowls and serve with the rice noodles.
  13. Voila!


Gut Healing Turmeric & Mushroom Curry Soup

Get stuck into a bowl of bubbling, warming, yellow-goodness
and enjoy the healing powers of turmeric, ginger and shitake mushrooms.

This healthy but yet tasty yummy broth will help your body fight bacteria and inflammation, boost your immune system,
and to keep those pesky bugs at bay (always good in a corona crisis!).

Weekly Recipe

Gut Healing Turmeric and Mushroom Curry Soup

Yield: One Large Pot of Broth

Gut Healing Turmeric & Mushroom Curry Soup

Gut Healing Turmeric & Mushroom Curry Soup

Inflammation calming, immune-boosting, gut healing yellow turmeric curry soup.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp sesame oil (leave out if on a cleanse, or if this is your evening meal, leave in).
  • half a shallot, chopped finely
  • 1 tsp anisseed
  • 1 tablespoon thai yellow curry paste (try and find a curry paste without added fats, maltodextrin, natural or unnatural flavourings, etc.)
  • 1 thumb size knob of fresh turmeric, sliced finely. If you haven't got fresh, use 2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 thumb-size knob fresh ginger, minced
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds, grind small in a pestle and mortar
  • 1/4 tsp dried thyme
  • 2 stalks of celery, chopped
  • 1 bok choi, chopped 
  • 1 zuchini, chopped
  • 200g shitake mushrooms, fresh or dried (important if dried: soak at least for 5 hours beforehand. If you can't get hold of shitake, brown button mushrooms work as a replacement)
  • toasted sesame seeds to garnish
  • 1.5 liter vegetable stock
  • 6 tbsp cocos aminos or lupin sauce, or both, depends how strong you like your flavouring.
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • juice of 1 lime (if you haven't got limes lemon juice works ok as well)
  • handful of fresh coriander, chopped
  • gluten free brown rice noodles, cooked to your liking
  • toasted sesame seeds or toasted nuts of your choice to garnish (leave out nuts and seeds if on a cleanse)
  • spinach or other leaves to garnish

Instructions

  1. Grab a large stock pot, and add about 3 tablespoons of water to the bottom.
  2. Add the sesame oil and place cooker on a low heat (skip this step if on a cleanse).
  3. Add the chopped shallot, minced ginger and chopped garlic. Mix well with the oil and the water. Add the yellow curry paste. Keep heat on a low setting and cook for 5-10 minutes, until onion is translucent and onion and garlic flavourful.
  4. Add the anisseeds, turmeric, thyme and fennel and mix in well. Up cooker to a medium heat and cook for another 5 minutes stirring frequently.
  5. Add the sliced celery and zuchini, stirr in well with the onion spice mixture and cook on medium heat for a few minutes.
  6. Add the vegetable stock and bring to a boil.
  7. Cover and simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. Add mushrooms and cocos aminos. Cook for another 10 minutes.
  9. Add the sliced bok choi, the lime juice and half of the coriander and cook for another 5 minutes.
  10. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Depending on what you used (cocos aminos, lupin sauce, or both), taste the broth and add more of what you feel is needed. I usually can't get enough of the cocos amino taste so I always add a bit more of that at the end.
  11. Serve the soup over gluten free brown rice noodles (or any other asian style noodles of your chosing), sprinkle with the rest of the coriander and top with sesame seeds, nuts or chilli flakes.
  12. Enjoy!