turmeric apple and banana porridge

Simple Apple & Banana Turmeric Porridge

Anti-Inflammatory Breakfast

This simple apple and banana porridge infused with turmeric provides a super healthy and anti-inflammatory breakfast to kick-start your day.

Why Turmeric?

TURMERIC is a POWERHOUSE, a plant with amazing healing and anti-inflammatory properties, and is one of the most powerful herbs on the planet today to help us humans shield from inflammation, prevent disease, and to keep our bodies strong and healthy. For a full article on what turmeric is and what it does, read on here. Turmeric is also well digested and tolerated by all three doshas. It can sometimes aggravate a very high Pitta, but you would have to take very high dosages for this to happen and a teaspoon like suggested in this recipe should be more than fine.

Why Porridge ?

Porridge is a very nourishing staple breakfast for people with sensitive bellies

A warm porridge in the morning can be a very healing and warming food, especially for people with food sensitivities. Porridge has become a staple in my breakfast repertoire and since consuming it regularly in the mornings, with a teaspoon of added linseeds, it has really improved my digestive issues. It sets me up nicely for the day, especially in autumn and winter times: it gives you this super-nice; cosy and warm feeling in your belly. Especially for Vata types what’s not to like! This porridge is also flavoured with yummy cinnamon. Cinnamon is well torleated by all three doashas, stabilizes blood sugar, reduces blood pressure and its prebiotic properties may improve gut health. For more info on Cinnamon’s benefits click here.

Always opt for Gluten-Free Porridge

I recommend always opting for gluten-free porridge oats. Oats can be cross-contaminated with gluten from the sites that they’re being processed at and only oats that especially state that they are gluten-free can claim to be free of this cross-contamination. I myself do not consume any gluten at all, as I believe gluten is a very triggering substance for most human beings today. I also have very sensitive digestion and food allergies and after swapping my standard porridge oats for gluten-free porridge oats, I realised that I could suddenly handle oats well, whereas this wasn’t the case before.

However in the rare case that you do not tolerate oats well, even when they’re gluten-free, try and opt for millet instead. You can simply cook the recipe below and use millet instead of oats. Or if you don’t tolerate millet either, chose a breakfast grain that you know you do tolerate well, as long as you make sure that it’s gluten free. For more info on gluten and other triggering foods read on here.

ayurveda

Feeling Vata: You can play around with other fruits for this porridge if you like, Vata does well on most sweet fruits. If you want to add dried fruits ensure you soak these overnight. For very ‘dry’ Vatas it can be a good idea to add a little linseed oil on top of your porridge when serving (not during cooking).

Feeling Pitta: Ensure the bananas are very ripe and sweet, if not you can replace the banana with sweet pears instead. Generally avoid any sour fruits. If worried about your Pitta being too high opt for half a teaspoon of turmeric or leave out completly.

Feeling Kapha: Oats are usually too heavy and can make a Kapha feel sluggish and tired. Replace the oats in this recipe with millet, buckwheat flakes or quinoa (amaranth can also be ok in moderation). You can replace the banana with pears.

Healing Recipe

Simple Apple & Banana Turmeric Porridge

turmeric apple and banana porridge

Simple Apple & Banana Turmeric Porridge

A warm porridge in the morning can be a very healing and warming food, especially for people with food sensitivities. Porridge has become a staple in my breakfast repertoire and since consuming it regularly in the mornings, with a teaspoon of added linseeds, it has really improved my digestive issues. It sets me up nicely for the day, especially in autumn and winter times: it gives you this super-nice; cosy and warm feeling in your belly. Especially for Vata types what's not to like! This porridge is also flavoured with yummy cinnamon. Cinnamon is well torleated by all three doashas, stabilizes blood sugar, reduces blood pressure and its prebiotic properties may improve gut health
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Course Breakfast
Servings 1

Ingredients
  

  • 1 medium banana chopped
  • 1 medium apple diced
  • 5 tbsp porridge oats gluten-free and soaked overnight
  • 1 tsp brown or golden linseeds (skip if doing a cleanse) soaked overnight
  • 1 tsp turmeric powder, ground
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamom optional

Instructions
 

  • Add the porridge oats and the linseeds (if using) to a heavy bottom sauce-pan and cover in water (just enough water to have everything just about covered)
  • Start cooking on medium heat, stirring frequently.
  • Add the chopped apple and banana.
  • Add the turmeric and the cinnamon (if using).
  • Add a pinch of salt and keep cooking for 10 – 15 minutes, stirring frequently, and until the apples are well cooked through.
  • Cook until you have reached a nice, creamy consistency. Add a bit more water at the time if the mix starts getting to dry and sticks to the bottom.
  • Take off the heat and serve.

Notes

You can sprinkle with some cinnamon and add maple or date syrup when serving to sweeten it up a bit. If not on a cleanse you can also sprinkle with nuts or seeds or try roasted coconut chips. 
Keyword apple, banana, porridge, turmeric


Nourishing Vegetable and Lentil Soup

Nourishing Vegetable & Lentil Soup

This nourishing vegetable and lentil soup is the perfect winter-warmer: I usually make it at least once a week and it eat it for days (reheated tastes even better).

This perfect winter-warmer is a winner for every dosha, simply follow the dosha adjustments below. This soup is fully packed with proteins. It’s giving you an amino-acid boost that bolsters your tissues and strengthens your immune system. Plus, a powerhouse of spices deliver antioxidants and anti-inflammatarory compounds: to let you fly with ease through the cold and flu season. Additional shitake mushrooms also provide this soup with a great earthy flavour and slightly ‘meaty’ texture.

Native to Asia, shitake mushrooms have gained widespread popularity across the world. They are the third most cultivated mushroom on the planet today. This isn’t surprising as shitake mushrooms boost quite the nutritional profile. They contain Vitamin D, Copper, Selenium, Thiamin (B1), Riboflavin (B2), Niacin (B3), Folate (B9) and B12 amongst others. But that’s not all. Shitake mushrooms are also said to have antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal properties. They are also said to be potent in fighting inflammations and helping in keeping your blood sugar stable.

Shitake mushrooms also deliver immune-modulating beta-glucans. Beta-glucans activate immune cells, increase antibody production, increase viral-inhibiting proteins and in short, they are great anti-cancer preventatives.

What more can you want from your soup?!

ayurveda

Feeling Vata: This soup is great for you. Swap brown lentils for red lentils for easier digestion and less bloating or gas.

Feeling Pitta: If your pitta is high swap potatoes with sweet potatoes and leave out the hot stuff such as paprika, cayenne and use less or no garlic. Skip the tomato paste.

Feeling Kapha: This is a great dish for you if you simply use a little bit less of the lentils and instead use more of the vegetables. All spices are great for Kapha, so go ahead and season well with the spices recomended in this recipe. Especially cayenne is great to boost Kapha’s sluggish metabolism.
Avoid the lemon in the end and go easy on the salt! Voila!

Weekly Recipe

Nourishing Vegetable & Lentil Soup

Yield: 1 pot

Nourishing Vegetable and Lentil Soup

Nourishing Vegetable and Lentil Soup

Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes

Ingredients

  • half a red onion, chopped
  • 2 x garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 x celery stalks, chopped
  • 3 x medium sized carrots, chopped
  • 1 x and a half cougette, chopped 
  • 2 x medium sized potatoes, chopped into small cubes
  • 150g shitake mushrooms (optional)
  • 1.5 x tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 x Litre vegetable stock / bouillon (yeast free, without added fats)
  • 1.5 cups brown lentils (alternatively use red lentils)
  • 1/2 x teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 x teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 2 x teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika powder
  • 1 x teaspoon of coriander seeds, ground in pestle & mortar
  • one pinch cayenne pepper
  • 1 x bay leaf
  • 1 x tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 x handful of parsley, chopped
  • 2 x handfuls of spinach, washed and trimmed
  • black pepper and salt for seasoning
  • juice from half a lemon

Instructions

  1. If you are using dry shitake mushrooms, ensure that you soak them in water before cooking for usually 5-8 hours (according to pack).
  2. Add the olive oil to a large stock pot. Heat slowly on a very low heat setting, then add the onions and the garlic. Stir with a wooden spoon for a while. Add the cinnamon, cumin, turmeric and add a little salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Grind the coriander seeds in a pestle & mortar and add as well.
  3. Stir the spices well into the oil and onion mix, until you you have a nice oily mix. Keep heating on low until the onions and garlic become fragrant and slightly translucent.
  4. Add the potatoe cubes and carrots, and stir into the onion spice mix. Heat up to a medium heat and keep stirring for about 3 to 5 minutes until the vegetables are nicely coated in spices and oil.
  5. Add the courgette and celery pieces and stir in to the mix for 1 minute. If the mix is to dry add a little water if need be.
  6. Now add the lentils. Stir well into the vegetable and spice mix.
  7. Add the paprika and tomato paste. Cook for 1 minute.
  8. Add the 1.5 Liters of vegetable stock. It should be enough stock in the pot that the vegetables and lentils are well covered (the lentils will soak up a lot of water during cooking). Add more water if not covered enough.
  9. Add the bay leaves.
  10. Bring to the boil, then reduce heat and simmer and cook for 10 minutes.
  11. Add the shitake mushrooms if using.
  12. Cook for another 20 minutes (unil the lentils are nice, soft and mushy and the vegetables are soft and tender, if not simply cook a bit longer until the soup has a nice consistency to your liking).
  13. Stir in the spinach and half of the chopped parsley, simmer for a another few minutes until the spinach is wilted and cooked to your liking.
  14. Squeeze half a lemon and stir through the soup.
  15. Take off the heat and season with salt and pepper.
  16. Serve and garnish with the left-over parsley, some vegan plant-based yoghurt,and if you're a Kapha type, some chillies and cherry tomatoes go a long way!

Notes

This soup is also delicious with some black beans or chickpeas additional or instead off the brown lentils if you're a pitta or a kapha type. Vata's better stay clear of too many legumes or beans.


sweet mung daal porridge

Sweet Mung Daal Porridge

This vitalising and cleansing sweet mung daal porridge will have you longing for more! Mung beans’ astringent nature literally scrapes your bowels clean. They draw out toxins from your digestive tract, clear up excess mucus and combat dampness in your body.

This sweet little number offers a great alternative to standard breakfasts such as oat porridge and Co. and can also be a welcome change for people sensitive to grains and pseudo-grains. Mung daal is high in protein, potassium, vitamins A, C, and E, magnesium, calcium and iron.

Health benefits of mung daal:

Mung daal is rich in micro-nutrients, namely potassium, iron, magnesium iron and copper. Additionally the little beans also contain B6, folate (B9) and fibre. Super high in protein mung daal is thus also a great food for vegetarians and vegans. In comparison to other beans, mung daal doesn’t usually produce the dreaded bloat that so often goes in hand in hand with digesting other types of beans and pulses. Yellow daal produces something called ‘butyrate’: a short-chained fatty acid. Butyrate makes yellow daal much easier to digest and it also helps to maintain the health of the digestive tract and walls.

ayurveda

Feeling Vata: mung daal can aggravate a very dry and light Vata type, however this breakfast is balancing out this effect with the sweetness of raisins and maple syrup. Cook the mung daal in some coconut oil and add some salt to taste.

Feeling Pitta: mung daal are great for Pitta’s as they are very cooling in nature. This is a great breakfast for you.

Feeling Kapha: You’ll enjoy this breakfast but it can be a bit on the heavy side for you. Add plenty of ginger and cinnamon and go a bit easier on the dried fruits and maple syrup.

Weekly Recipe

Sweet Mung Daal Porridge

Sweet Mung Daal Porridge

sweet mung daal porridge

This vitalising and cleansing breakfast will have you longing for more! Mung beans astringent nature literally scrapes your bowels clean. They draw out toxins from your digestive tract, clear up excess mucus and combat dampness in your body.

This sweet little number offers a great alternative to standard breakfasts such as oat porridge and Co. and can also be a welcome change for people sensitive to grains and pseudo-grains. Mung dal is high in protein, potassium, vitamins A, C, and E, magnesium, calcium and iron.

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • 100g mung daal (soaked over night in water)
  • 2 x cups of water
  • 1/2 x teaspoon turmeric (curcuma)
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds (ground in pestle and mortar)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 250ml oat-milk (or plant milk of your choice, just ensure it hasn't got any extra fats added to it. Most plant milks have added sunflower oils or other fats added and trust me this ain't good for your health. I use oatly's organic oat milk and it's free of any extra added fats.)
  • 3 x tablespoons maple syrup
  • seeds of 2-3 cardamom pods, freshly ground in pestle and mortar
  • 1 x thumb size knob of fresh ginger, minced
  • handful of raisins, soaked over night
  • optional: 1/2 teaspoon of saffron strands

Instructions

  1. Drain the soaked mung daal and add to a frying pan. Roast in the frying pan on a medium heat until the daal becomes fragrant and is lightly roasted.
  2. Add the roasted mung daal to a medium sized sauce pan and add water, turmeric, cinnamon and coriander seeds. Put a lid on and simmer for about 15 minutes and until everyrthing is nice and mushy.
  3. Now take a potato masher and mash everything in the pot until you have your preferred consistency.
  4. Add the plant milk, maple syrup, the cardamom seeds, fresh ginger and a bit of salt and pepper to taste (optional: add the saffron strands) and bring everything to the boil.
  5. Cover and simmer for about 10 - 15 minutes.
  6. Add the soaked raisins and mix through. Cook for another minute or so.
  7. Serve in bowls and garnish with chopped and roasted almonds, a sprinkle of cinnamon and drizzle with maple syrup to taste.

Turmeric – A Golden Ray Of Sunshine Goodness

‘Turmeric’, ‘Curcuma’, ‘Kurkuma’, ‘the golden spice’, ‘the yellow gold’ and ‘golden goddess’ to name but few. This super spice has many names, and just as many, if not more, excuberant healing powers.

Mainly used in Indian cuisine, hailed for its flavour in traditional currys, soups and stews, and due to its amazing deep yellow tone for its great colouring abilities (careful of those food stains); turmeric is but not just a simple spice. Turmeric is a POWERHOUSE, a power-plant with amazing healing and anti-inflammatory abilities, and is one of the most powerful herbs on the planet today to help us humans shield from inflammation, prevent disease, and to keep our bodies strong and healthy.

Curcuma Longa’ which is the Latin name for turmeric, comes from the Arabic name for the plant, ‘Kurkum’ and is a member of the ginger family (Zingiberacea), which includes ginger and galangal.

Turmeric is actually a beautiful tall growing green and flowering plant. The part that is used in cooking as a spice and for supplementation in natural medicine are the fingerlike stalks (Rhizome) that grow beneath
the earth’s surface. Looking similar to the ginger root, when you cut open a turmeric root, you’ll see its blooming yellow, almost orange colour coming out.

If you haven’t cooked with turmeric yet, you might have come across turmeric through the ‘Turmeric (‘Curcuma’) Latte’ trend that has kind of exploded over the past 2 years. Also referred to as ‘Golden Milk‘, plant or animal milk is heatet and then mixed with turmeric powder, honey and other spices such as cardamom and black pepper. Apart from its nourishing and calming taste, a ‘Turmeric Latte’ doesn’t only just taste good, it has many healing benefits for you and your body.

Turmeric has been used as a plant medicine and a healing herb in traditional philosophies such as Ayuveda for over more than 3000 years. Ancient scripts that were written thousand of years ago already talk about the healing power of the golden goddess:

  • ‘Jvaraghna’: relieves fever.
  • ‘Viṣaghna’: destroys toxins and poisons.
  • Kusthagna’: eliminates skin diseases
  • ‘Kaṇḍughna’: anti-itching
  • ‘Vedanāsthāpana’: soothes pain
  • ‘Raktasodhana’: blood purifying
  • ‘Prameha’: helps with diabetes
  • ‘Sirovirecana’: eliminates congestion in the head area
  • and many, many more…

Today modern science has proven turmeric effective through countless studies,
and can confirm what ancient traditions already knew to be the truth for centuries:

Turmeric has proven very effective in treating some of the most intense illnesses that we experience in the world today such as: Cancer, Diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis, Atherosclerosis, Indigestion, Inflammation, Acne, Urinary Tract Infections, Kidney Infections, Gallstones, Anemia, Hemorrhoids, Liver Disease, Alzheimer’s Disease, HIV/AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Diseases (Hepatitis-C, Genital Herpes) , Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Edema, Bronchitis, Common Cold, Headaches, parasites, diarrhea, poor circulation, lower back and abdominal pain. It can also be used as wound healer, and it helps balance the female reproductive system. In men it purifies and improves the health of semen.

The reason for turmeric being able to treat so many different diseases lies in its incredible anti-inflammatory capacity:
Anti-inflammatory means in a very literal sense, for example, to reduce swelling. Say you have been in an accident and sprained your ankle. Chances are high that you’ll experience a swelling of some sort, maybe some redness, tender pain on touching and a warm sensation in the area of the injury. This is simply a natural reaction of your body to induce healing: a natural state of inflammation to induce a healing response. Inflammation can also occur on the insides of our bodies, where we can’t see it, and more often than not, don’t even feel it.

Imagine little tiny construction sites that you’re body is working on constantly at all times to keep you healthy. This is totally normal and happens all the time without us noticing. Inflammation is really a natural process in which enzymes, prostaglandines and other inflammatory proteins (Cox-2, NF-kB, Lox-5, to name but a few) up and down regulate inflammation as part of the inflammatory response pathway. Modern day living however, mainly trough oxidative stress, can cause the inflammation response to ‘get out of control’:

When inflammation becomes a problem:
Our bodies are bombarded constantly with environmental poisons, toxic foods, stress and so forth: too many coffees, pesticides, rushing to work, an argument with the boss, drinking alcohol at night. Holding tension day in and day out, without giving our body the rest it deserves. And suddenly we find ourselves in a downward spiral of uncontrollable digestive issues, auto-immune-diseases or cancer. Scientists now believe that chronic, low-level inflammation plays a major role in almost every chronic, western disease. We have come under so much stress that the standard inflammation pathway can literally not regulate itself anymore efficiently.

Turmeric is hailed as one of the best natural anti-inflammatories in the world today:
Countless studies have shown that turmeric helps to immensily improve the inflammation responses in our bodies, helping us heal quicker from illness and improving the time-span from when inflammation first occurs to its natural conclusion. Thus swellings reduce faster, wounds heal quicker and infections can ease off sooner.

The active compounds in turmeric, one of them being called curcumin, are strongly anti-inflammatory.
In fact, they’re so powerful that it matches the effectiveness of some anti-inflammatory drugs, without the side effects. It blocks NF-kB, a molecule that travels into the nuclei of your cells and turns on genes related to inflammation. NF-kB is believed to play a major role in many chronic diseases.

Furthermore, turmeric and its active compounds dramatically increase the anti-oxidant capacity of the cells in our bodies:
Curcumin is a potent antioxidant that can neutralize free radicals due to its chemical structure. It has also been shown to increase the production of Nrf2, a multi-organ protector that helps our bodies fight ROS (reactive oxygen species). Thus curcumin boosts the activity of your body’s own antioxidant enzymes.

In summary, turmeric and its compounds such as curcumin, have powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant capacities. With oxidative stress and chronic inflammation being the major causes for modern day health problems, turmeric can be instrumental in helping to fight aging and in preventing degenerative disease.

Read Next:
Turmeric’s therapeutic effects:
standard spice vs. turmeric supplementation


Recipes Featuring Turmeric:



References:

Curcumin upregulates the Nrf2 system by repressing inflammatory signaling-mediated Keap1 expression in insulin-resistant conditions.

Role of Nrf2 in Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

Curcumin Activates the Nrf2 Pathway and Induces Cellular Protection Against Oxidative Injury.

Anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin, a major constituent of Curcuma longa: a review of preclinical and clinical research


Warming Turmeric & Cauliflower Broth

Weekly Recipe

Warming Cauliflower & Turmeric Broth

Yield: 1 Large Stock Pot

Warming Turmeric & Cauliflower Broth

Warming Turmeric & Cauliflower Broth
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 shallot, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, diced
  • 5 tsp yellow Lupin Miso (I don't use Soya products as I strongly believe these increase inflammation in the body). You can omit this ingredient and just flavour more with salt, pepper, stock, and coconut aminos or lupin sauce.
  • 1 tsp anisseeds
  • 1 fingerlong fresh root of turmeric, minced
  • 1 inch fresh ginger, minced
  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 200g brown button mushrooms, chopped
  • quarter head cauliflower, chopped into florets
  • 1 medium zuchini, chopped and diced
  • 1.5 litres vegetable stock
  • 6 tsbp cocos aminos
  • 3 tsp powdered turmeric
  • one chicoree head, sliced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • brown rice noodles (I use king soba noodles)
  • juice of 1 and 1/2 lemon

Instructions

  1. To a large stock pot, add the shallot, ginger, the fresh turmeric, garlic and aniseeds (ground in pestle and mortar). Add half a cup of water, and stirr occasionally, cooking on low heat until the shallot and garlic become fragrant and translucent for a about 5 minutes.
  2. Stirr in the lupin miso and cook for another 2 minutes.
  3. Stir in the chopped mushrooms and keep cooking on low heat for another 5 minutes, stirring occassionally.
  4. Stirr in the chopped zuchini and cauliflower and cook for another 2 minutes on low heat, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add the vegetable stock to the mushroom mix, stirring well.
  6. Add the cocos aminos and the turmeric powder.
  7. Bring to the boil, then lower heat to a simmer.
  8. Simmer for 15 minutes, lid on.
  9. Add the chicoree and simmer for another 5 minutes, plus add salt and pepper to taste.
  10. In the meantime boil the rice noodles according to instructions in a seperate pot.
  11. Stir the lemon juice into the broth and let it sit off the heat for 1 minute.
  12. Ladle the broth into bowls and serve with the rice noodles.
  13. Voila!


Gut Healing Turmeric & Mushroom Curry Soup

Get stuck into a bowl of bubbling, warming, yellow-goodness
and enjoy the healing powers of turmeric, ginger and shitake mushrooms.

This healthy but yet tasty yummy broth will help your body fight bacteria and inflammation, boost your immune system,
and to keep those pesky bugs at bay (always good in a corona crisis!).

Weekly Recipe

Gut Healing Turmeric and Mushroom Curry Soup

Yield: One Large Pot of Broth

Gut Healing Turmeric & Mushroom Curry Soup

Gut Healing Turmeric & Mushroom Curry Soup

Inflammation calming, immune-boosting, gut healing yellow turmeric curry soup.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp sesame oil (leave out if on a cleanse, or if this is your evening meal, leave in).
  • half a shallot, chopped finely
  • 1 tsp anisseed
  • 1 tablespoon thai yellow curry paste (try and find a curry paste without added fats, maltodextrin, natural or unnatural flavourings, etc.)
  • 1 thumb size knob of fresh turmeric, sliced finely. If you haven't got fresh, use 2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 thumb-size knob fresh ginger, minced
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds, grind small in a pestle and mortar
  • 1/4 tsp dried thyme
  • 2 stalks of celery, chopped
  • 1 bok choi, chopped 
  • 1 zuchini, chopped
  • 200g shitake mushrooms, fresh or dried (important if dried: soak at least for 5 hours beforehand. If you can't get hold of shitake, brown button mushrooms work as a replacement)
  • toasted sesame seeds to garnish
  • 1.5 liter vegetable stock
  • 6 tbsp cocos aminos or lupin sauce, or both, depends how strong you like your flavouring.
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • juice of 1 lime (if you haven't got limes lemon juice works ok as well)
  • handful of fresh coriander, chopped
  • gluten free brown rice noodles, cooked to your liking
  • toasted sesame seeds or toasted nuts of your choice to garnish (leave out nuts and seeds if on a cleanse)
  • spinach or other leaves to garnish

Instructions

  1. Grab a large stock pot, and add about 3 tablespoons of water to the bottom.
  2. Add the sesame oil and place cooker on a low heat (skip this step if on a cleanse).
  3. Add the chopped shallot, minced ginger and chopped garlic. Mix well with the oil and the water. Add the yellow curry paste. Keep heat on a low setting and cook for 5-10 minutes, until onion is translucent and onion and garlic flavourful.
  4. Add the anisseeds, turmeric, thyme and fennel and mix in well. Up cooker to a medium heat and cook for another 5 minutes stirring frequently.
  5. Add the sliced celery and zuchini, stirr in well with the onion spice mixture and cook on medium heat for a few minutes.
  6. Add the vegetable stock and bring to a boil.
  7. Cover and simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. Add mushrooms and cocos aminos. Cook for another 10 minutes.
  9. Add the sliced bok choi, the lime juice and half of the coriander and cook for another 5 minutes.
  10. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Depending on what you used (cocos aminos, lupin sauce, or both), taste the broth and add more of what you feel is needed. I usually can't get enough of the cocos amino taste so I always add a bit more of that at the end.
  11. Serve the soup over gluten free brown rice noodles (or any other asian style noodles of your chosing), sprinkle with the rest of the coriander and top with sesame seeds, nuts or chilli flakes.
  12. Enjoy!